Newcastle Doctor Jailed For Dealing Drugs via the Dark Web

A UK man has been jailed for dealing in illegal drugs via the dark web. 28-year-old Tim Kerr, a doctor and his counterpart, a university friend Adrian Tickridge-Day, 27, imported drugs from the dark web and sold them on the streets. Kerr, when not saving lives at a hospital in Newcastle, was busy being a dark web drug trafficker and together with his friend, they made thousands from their criminal enterprise. Kerr was handed a four-year and eight months prison sentence at Chester Crown Court on Friday, June 22, the same sentence his other partner Tickridge-Day received last year. Kerr is expected to serve half of his sentence in custody and the other half on a licence. Prosecutor Mandy Nepal told the court that Kerr and Tickridge-Day had numerous clients and were selling the drugs in the country as well as overseas.

The duo’s criminal business was zeroed in by the police after customs officers intercepted a package on March 29, 2016. They bought Ketamine, cocaine, and ecstasy from a dealer on the dark web and had it shipped to an address in Chester which belonged to Tickridge-Day. The package was later revealed to be containing 220 ecstasy tablets and was traced to Tickridge-Day. The two were apprehended at the Manchester Airport in April 2016, after coming back from a trip to Austria. The police then arrested Tickridge after he was found in possession of £2,000 in cash and two mobile phones.

A search warrant was later executed on Tickridge-Day’s residence in Chester where police uncovered a load of class “A” and “B” drugs, digital scales and sandwich bags. Kerr was then taken into custody after phone records linked him to the illegal drug business.

Kerr’s defense attorney Adam Antoszkiw argued in court that his client had a not-so-great childhood after he lost his father at just 11 years old. He, however, didn’t let that tragedy hold him back as he studied hard and went on to become a doctor. He added that his client got involved with drugs in the university and later got addicted to them. “He is not blasé about these offenses. He has had a very long time to come to terms with what is going to happen today,” Antoszkiw stated.

Judge Patrick Thompson, who sentenced Kerr, acknowledged the fact that, Kerr’s unpleasant childhood might have affected him and his family, unfortunately. Also, he decided to get involved in drugs at the university, abusing the gift he was given and resorted to buying drugs from the dark web. “It’s a tragedy for you because I’m afraid your career has been thrown away,” Judge Thompson said to him.

Detective Constable Tom Philpotts, of Chester CID, also speaking after the sentencing expressed his surprise as to why Kerr would get involved in something like this, given the fact that he is a doctor and has adequate knowledge on the dangers associated with taking the drugs he was selling. Both men had a clean record before their arrest and pleaded guilty to two counts of conspiracy to supply A drugs, one of conspiracy to supply class B drugs and one of importing drugs.

Kerr and Tickridge-Day’s arrest now adds up to a list of Brits who have been sentenced this year for dealing illegal drugs from the dark web. Earlier this year. A gang from Leeds was busted for buying and selling drugs via the dark web. They had set up a mail order drug business, selling lethal drugs which were stronger than morphine, which led to the death of six of their customers and also connected to 125 deaths in the UK.

Under the moniker “UKBargains” Jake Levene, 22, Lee Childs, 45, and Mandy Lowther, 21, sold illegal drugs and made almost £163,474 in just five months.

Reports suggest that the trio sold over 2,853 illegal substances to over 172 people in Britain and 271 to other countries which included Canada, Singapore, Argentina, Holland, Spain, France, Germany, and Norway. A police raid on their mechanical unit in Morley led to their arrest. They found fentanyl, funnels, digital scales, equipment for mixing and blending the drug, and a vacuum sealer.